Courses in this category refer to the Researcher Development Framework Domain A: Knowledge and Intellectual Abilities.

This refers to the knowledge, intellectual abilities and techniques to do research.

This workshop aims to clearly define a Literature Review and set out the process that is required to create one.

Test the search strategies and statements that you developed in 'Finding resources for your literature review and beyond - Theory', as well as trying out citation searching techniques and setting up alerts to keep you up-to-date and further develop your knowledge of your research topic. Expert help will be on hand to guide and support you.

Develop your knowledge and intellectual abilities, so that you will be able to seek and find research material in an effective and efficient manner using the resources available to you at Loughborough University but also in the future too.

A systematic review is becoming an increasingly popular method for providing an overview of a research area, but how does it differ from a 'normal' literature review and when is it appropriate to do one and what is involved?  Find out more in this session.

Everyone can search Google and get some results, but if you want your literature search to be comprehensive what are the techniques that can be used to improve relevancy and save you time?  Find out more in this session.

A selection of language and grammar features often associated with academic writing style will be placed in the critical spotlight. Participants have the opportunity to focus on distinctions between arguably less/more appropriate academic writing style features (as well as the effectiveness of the communication impact involved). There will be the opportunity to reflect on how ‘expert’ writing appears to incorporate style characteristics. An underpinning aim of the activities is to examine critically the conscious and intuitive language choices made to communicate a written discipline identity, style and voice. The session will include a range of hands-on activities and discussions.


Significant corpus research repeatedly shows that written academic discourse has become dominated by nominalised and noun phrase writing styles, often at the expense of verbs and clauses (and arguably at the expense of communicative clarity and impact). This prevalence has been on the increase over the last few decades (Biber and Gray, 2011), and has implications for those wishing to make a mark in the academic publishing world: it is often suggested that use of nominal styles may reflect the apparent relative expertise of an academic writer. In this session, awareness will be raised about this phenomenon, and some of its implications for writers and readers, via a number of text analysis, discussion, and practice activities.

Informed by English for Academic Purposes research and scholarship, this workshop focuses on features associated with an Introduction-Methods-Results-Discussion (IMRD) structure which often forms the typical ‘backbone’ of written research genres in a wide range of academic fields (Swales, 1990). A review of this structure is presented for exploration, together with an overview of common functions and language features across the different sections. The session will include a range of hands-on activities and discussions.

In this session, participants have the opportunity more consciously to examine typical Research Article genre ‘moves’ (Swales, 1990) and associated language features that published writers tend to use when they write Abstracts. Typical functions and sequencing of information in abstracts, as well as some associated language use, will be brought to the fore via various awareness-raising tasks and activities, with the purpose of transferring awareness and learning to participants’ academic disciplinary practice.


In this session, participants will have the opportunity more consciously to examine typical Research Article genre ‘moves’ (Swales, 1990) and associated language features that published writers tend to use when they write Introductions (including elements of Literature Review sections). Typical functions and sequencing of information in Introductions, as well as some associated language use, will be brought to the fore via various awareness-raising tasks and activities with the purpose of transferring awareness and learning to academic disciplinary practice.

In this session, participants will have the opportunity more consciously to examine typical Research Article genre ‘moves’ (Swales, 1990) and associated language features that published writers tend to use when they write Methods sections. Typical functions and sequencing of information in Methods sections, as well as some associated language use, will be brought to the fore via various awareness-raising tasks and activities with the purpose of transferring awareness and learning to academic disciplinary practice.


In this session, participants will have the opportunity more consciously to examine typical Research Article genre ‘moves’ (Swales, 1990) and associated language features that published writers tend to use when they write Results sections. Typical functions and sequencing of information in Results sections, as well as some associated language use, will be brought to the fore via various awareness-raising tasks and activities with the purpose of transferring awareness and learning to academic disciplinary practice. This will include discussion of the extent to which these sections might include writer commentary on results relative to the kinds of commentary which may occur in Discussion and/or Conclusion sections.


In this session, participants will have the opportunity more consciously to examine typical Research Article genre ‘moves’ (Swales, 1990) and associated language features that published writers tend to use when they write Discussion sections. Typical functions and sequencing of information in Discussion sections, as well as some associated language use, will be brought to the fore via various awareness-raising tasks and activities with the purpose of transferring awareness and learning to academic disciplinary practice. This will include discussion of the extent to which these sections might include writer commentary on results relative to the kinds of commentary which may occur in Results and or Conclusion sections.

This course gives you an opportunity to consider the importance of creative thinking to research and to evaluate some of the techniques used to promote creativity.

The aim of this workshop is to introduce the basic ideas of statistics.

The presentation will concern practical rather than theoretical aspects and will include the difference between populations and samples, the calculation of measures of location (e.g. mean) and spread (e.g. standard deviation), the calculation and interpretation of standard errors and the normal distribution.

An introduction to statistics and SPSS aimed at participants with no (or very little/distant) knowledge of SPSS and/or statistical methods. Main topics are (i) the role of statistics in research and (ii) data entry/manipulation in SPSS.

An introduction to analysing data using SPSS aimed at participants with no (or very little/distant) knowledge of SPSS. The focus is on calculating summary statistics, tables and charts for data (not more sophisticated methods covered in other workshops). Participants must already be familiar with data entry and manipulation in SPSS.

The aim of this workshop is to discuss the role that statistical analysis plays in the research study process. A range of different types of study/experimental designs will be discussed along with the benefits to be gained from good designs. The workshop requires little background in terms of mathematics and statistics.

The aim of this workshop is to provide a hands-on introduction to some of the basic methods that can be used to analyse data from questionnaires. It would be useful (but not essential) if participants had some basic knowledge of statistical inference and of SPSS.


An introduction to correlation and linear regression aimed at participants with very little statistical background. The focus is on when these methods can be applied and how to interpret the results. Ideally participants will already be familiar with SPSS and with some simpler statistical inference procedures such as t-tests and/or ANOVA, but this is not essential.

The aim of this workshop is to introduce the basic principles of good questionnaire design and to discuss the general process of developing a suitable questionnaire that meets the needs of the research and/or study process.

The aim of this workshop is to provide a hands-on introduction to two statistical methods; paired and unpaired t-tests. It would be useful (but not essential) if participants had some basic knowledge of statistical inference and of SPSS.

The aim of this workshop is to provide a hands-on introduction to a statistical test called the chi-squared test, used to analyse data where both the outcome variable and predictor variable are categorical. It would be useful (but not essential) if participants had some basic knowledge of statistical inference and of SPSS.

The aim of this workshop is to provide a hands-on introduction to non-parametric statistics. This includes the Mann-Whitney test and the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Spearman’s rank correlation will also be considered. It would be useful (but not essential) if participants had some basic knowledge of statistical inference and of SPSS.

An introduction to correlation and linear regression aimed at participants with very little statistical background. The focus is on when these methods can be applied and how to interpret the results. Ideally participants will already be familiar with SPSS and with some simpler statistical inference procedures such as t-tests and/or ANOVA, but this is not essential.

An introduction to correlation and linear regression aimed at participants with very little statistical background. The focus is on when these methods can be applied and how to interpret the results. Ideally participants will already be familiar with SPSS and with some simpler statistical inference procedures such as t-tests and/or ANOVA, but this is not essential